Tagged photography

Closing soon: “Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age”

"Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region's future due to the toxic rocket fuel." 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos
“Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region’s future due to the toxic rocket fuel.” 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos

The Harry Ransom Center’s exhibition Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age will close soon on Sunday, January 5.

 

Don’t miss your chance to see the exhibition before it closes. Enjoy free docent-led tours of the exhibition on Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. No reservations required.

 

Magnum Photos photographers have produced some of the most memorable images of the last century. Founded in 1947, it was the first cooperative agency to be established and operated by photographers, thus insuring unprecedented creative, editorial, and economic independence. Drawing largely upon the vast collection of prints from the agency’s New York bureau, this exhibition investigates the evolution of Magnum Photos from print photojournalism to the digital age, revealing a global cooperative in continual flux.

 

Organized by Jessica S. McDonald and Roy L. Flukinger, the exhibition features approximately 300 works. The Magnum Photos collection was donated to the Ransom Center by Michael and Susan Dell, Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman, and John and Amy Phelan.

 

Ransom Center Galleries are open on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. Please note the Ransom Center will be closed on December 24, December 25, and January 1.

 

Beginning January 6, the Ransom Center Galleries will be closed until February 11, when the exhibition The World at War, 1914–1918 opens. The Gutenberg Bible and First Photograph remain on permanent display.

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Eli Reed. "Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya." August 2001, printed 2013. Inkjet print. © Eli Reed / Magnum Photos.

“Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan” exhibition opens at the Harry Ransom Center

Eli Reed. "Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya." August 2001, printed 2013. Inkjet print. © Eli Reed / Magnum Photos.
Eli Reed. “Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya.” August 2001, printed 2013. Inkjet print. © Eli Reed / Magnum Photos.

The Harry Ransom Center presents Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan, an exhibition of photographs by Eli Reed (b. 1946), Magnum photographer and Clinical Professor of Photojournalism at The University of Texas at Austin. In 2001, Reed traced the path of some of the more than 20,000 “Lost Boys,” as aid workers have called them, some as young as five years old, forced to flee after their families were massacred or enslaved during the Second Sudanese Civil War. Wandering the equatorial wilderness between Sudan and Ethiopia for years on foot, those who survived starvation and disease eventually reached a refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, where over 3,000 of them awaited resettlement through a United Nations partnership with the U. S. State Department. Reed’s powerful series documents their journey as they leave the camp and adjust to life in the United States, acclimating to a starkly different culture and a new world of formidable challenges.

Organized by curators Jessica S. McDonald and Roy L. Flukinger, Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan runs through December 8. Additional photographs by Reed from his 1995 series Rwandan Refugees in Tanzania are on view as part of the exhibition Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age, which features over 450 photographs, books, magazines, films, and videos.

Reed joined the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin in January 2005. He has been associated with the Magnum Photos agency since 1983 and became a full member in 1988. His early projects focus on political upheaval and social justice in El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, and Panama. In 1982 he was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he studied political science, urban affairs, and the prospects for peace in Central America. He has since photographed around the world while persistently addressing political, social, and racial issues in the United States.

Reed is the author of the acclaimed books Beirut: City of Regrets(1988) and Black in America (1997). He directed the documentary film Getting Out (1992) on Detroit gangs, and has worked as a stills and specials photographer for major motion pictures. His photographs have been published in numerous magazines and newspapers, including National GeographicTimeNewsweekThe New York TimesThe Washington PostVogueHarpers Bazaar,Stern, and Vanity Fair. Reed has lectured and taught extensively, and his photographs have been exhibited internationally. In 2009 he delivered a four-part lecture and multimedia presentation at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway, for the opening night of the exhibition “Fra King til Obama.”

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Opening today at the Harry Ransom Center: “Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age”

"Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region's future due to the toxic rocket fuel." 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos
“Russia. Altai Territory. Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, surrounded by thousands of white butterflies. Environmentalists fear for the region’s future due to the toxic rocket fuel.” 2000. © Jonas Bendiksen/Magnum Photos

The exhibition Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age opens today at the Harry Ransom Center and will be on view through January 5.

 

Magnum Photos photographers have produced some of the most memorable images of the last century, shaping history and revolutionizing photography’s influence on modern culture. Founded in 1947, it was the first cooperative agency to be established and operated by photographers, thus ensuring unprecedented creative, editorial, and economic independence.

 

Its founders, including renowned photographers Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David “Chim” Seymour, and George Rodger, united in their pursuit of creative freedom and their commitment to sharing their images with the world. Membership in this collective empowered photographers to document conflict and liberation, revolution and reform, while preserving their own powerfully distinct points of view.

 

Established during the post-war golden age of the picture magazine, Magnum has flourished despite the impact of radical technological, economic, and cultural transformations on publishing and media. When television began to take over as the dominant form of mass communication in the 1950s, Magnum photographers explored motion picture and book formats. As the editorial market continued to shrink, photographers found new audiences in museums and galleries. Over the last decade, new technologies have dramatically changed the way photographic imagery is captured, distributed, and consumed. In this new environment, Magnum photographers have kept pace, experimenting with a variety of multimedia platforms to publish their work.

 

Organized by Jessica S. McDonald and Roy L. Flukinger, this exhibition of approximately 300 works investigates the evolution of Magnum Photos from print photojournalism to the digital age, revealing a global cooperative in continual flux, persistently exploring new relationships between photographers, their subjects, and their viewers.

 

Coinciding with the exhibition is the publication of Reading Magnum: A Visual Archive of the Modern World (UT Press), edited by Steven Hoelscher, Academic Curator of Photography at the Ransom Center.

 

The Magnum Photos Collection resides at the Harry Ransom Center courtesy of MSD Capital, Michael and Susan Dell, Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman, and John and Amy Phelan.

 

Beginning September 17, free docent tours will be offered Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

 

For groups larger than 10 people, please contact the Ransom Center to make arrangements for a private group tour.

 

The fall calendar includes many Magnum Photos-related programs, including “Boundless,” the opening celebration for the exhibition on Friday, September 20.

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Closing soon: “Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive” at the Ransom Center

Alvin Langdon Coburn, "Vortograph," 1917.
Alvin Langdon Coburn, “Vortograph,” 1917.
Barry Stone, "Sky 3099," 2012.
Barry Stone, “Sky 3099,” 2012.

Although almost a century separates Alvin Langdon Coburn’s Vortograph (1917) and Barry Stone’s Sky 3099 (2012), Stone still finds parallels between the works. It is this connection between old and new that informs the Ransom Center’s current exhibition, Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive.

Created in conjunction with the Lakes Were Rivers collective, an Austin-based group of artists working in photography and video, the exhibition highlights members’ works that were influenced in some way by the Ransom Center. Approximately 50 new works are displayed alongside Ransom Center collection materials chosen by the artists. The pairings illustrate how archives and cultural collections stimulate new ideas and creative acts.

Widely acknowledged as the first consciously created abstract photographs, Coburn’s vortographs were taken using a kaleidoscope-like instrument that fit over the lens of a camera to reflect and fracture the image. Their name comes from the term “Vorticist,” which describes an avant-garde British artistic and literary movement spearheaded by Wyndham Lewis and influenced by Cubism.

In many ways, Coburn’s earlier technical photographic experiments mirror Stone’s current work—black-and-white digital captures of landscapes in which Stone has altered the image file’s code or machine language in a text-editing program. This process, called databending, creates visual hiccups within the otherwise unaltered image. Stone’s Sky 3099 provides an example of the technique, billowing clouds interrupted by swaths of visual static. As the artist notes, “The noise, therefore, becomes more like the signal. The anomaly or glitch is assimilated into the image and reveals not only the methods of its assembly but also a glimpse of new perceptual possibilities.”

Both Sky 3099 and Vortograph are on display through August 4 at the Harry Ransom Center. The Ransom Center Galleries are open Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours to 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

Free docent-led tours are offered Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

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Is it Real? “Lifelike” on View this Summer at the Blanton

By Alexandra Clark, Blanton Museum of Art

A Pink Pearl eraser, cardboard box, drill, and giant plank of plywood—are these items the instruments of creativity or masterpieces within themselves? This summer at the Blanton Museum of Art, we entertain this question through our presentation of the whimsical and thought provoking Lifelike. An international, multigenerational exhibition, Lifelike showcases 75 works from prominent contemporary artists including Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, James Casebere, Vija Celmins, Keith Edmier, Robert Gober, and Jasper Johns. Lifelike illuminates the artists’ infatuation with realism and invites viewers to celebrate everyday objects in an engaging, playful way. Read more

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Now open at the Harry Ransom Center: “Literature and Sport” and “Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive”

"Literature and Sport" and "Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive" are on view at the Harry Ransom Center through August 4.
“Literature and Sport” and “Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive” are on view at the Harry Ransom Center through August 4.

Two new exhibitions, Literature and Sport and Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive open today at the Ransom Center.

 

Sport holds a sacred place in Western culture and literature. Writers as diverse as Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Norman Mailer, Marianne Moore, Don DeLillo, Joyce Carol Oates, and David Foster Wallace have written about sport.

 

Drawn exclusively from the Ransom Center’s collections, Literature and Sport showcases the literature of sport through fiction, essays, poetry, and plays. Organized by sport, the exhibition highlights some of the finest examples of literary writing about baseball, football, boxing, tennis, cricket, bullfighting, and other sports. From Bernard Malamud’s The Natural to Norman Mailer’s The Fight, great literary works capture the appeal of sport and its ability to transform both the individual and society, all the while demonstrating how writers elevate language to literature.

 

Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive was created in cooperation with the Lakes Were Rivers collective, an Austin-based group of artists working in photography and video. Members of the collective created a body of work influenced in some way by the Ransom Center—its space, its purpose, its collections. Approximately 50 new works are displayed alongside Ransom Center collection materials chosen by the artists, including photographs by Ansel Adams and Man Ray, manuscripts from the E. E. Cummings archive, William Blake’s Songs of Innocence, an embellished Maurice Ravel score, and props from the Robert De Niro collection.

Both exhibitions are on display through August 4 and can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours to 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

Beginning June 18, free docent-led tours are offered on Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., Saturdays at 2 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Join us for an “All-Star Evening,” the opening celebration for the summer exhibitions Literature and Sport and Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive, this Friday from 7 to 9 p.m.  Become a member now to receive complimentary admission and valet parking at this event. If you are not yet a member, tickets are available for $20 at the door (valet parking not included for non-members).

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news-to-history

“News to History: Photojournalism and the Presidency”

The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History and the LBJ Presidential Library are proud to announce the exhibit, News to History: Photojournalism and the Presidency. The exhibit, on display at the newly renovated LBJ Presidential Library will run until October 1, 2013.

Showcasing the Briscoe Center’s unparalleled photographic collections, News to History highlights the thirteen presidential administrations from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Barack Obama. The exhibit features the iconic images that captured the interaction of each president with their era.

“Historians use a wide variety of sources to interpret the past, but the still photographs shot by photojournalists are among the most compelling sources we have for documenting and understanding our history,” said Don Carleton, executive director of the Briscoe Center. “The photographs we are displaying in News to History are an outstanding example of the value of this resource for teaching and research.”

“We are delighted to partner with the Briscoe Center in providing our visitors with a riveting journey through 80 years of Presidential administrations,” said Mark Updegrove, director of the LBJ Presidential Library.

Since 1992, the Center has conducted an ambitious program to collect and preserve the historically valuable imagery produced by photojournalists. The photographers whose work is displayed in News to History have placed their archives with the Briscoe Center. Today, the Briscoe Center preserves the largest single collection of photographs of the U.S. presidency outside of Washington, D.C.

In addition to photographic holdings (such as slides, negatives, prints, and tear sheets), the photojournalism collections comprise such archival materials as personal papers, correspondence, diaries, news stories, and three-dimensional artifacts. The combination of these materials provides researchers with remarkable primary source evidence for interpreting history. The Briscoe Center is an organized research unit of the University of Texas at Austin.

For more information, visit The Briscoe Center for American History.

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Opening tomorrow at the Ransom Center: “Arnold Newman: Masterclass”

"Arnold Newman: Masterclass" opens tomorrow and runs through May 12 at the Harry Ransom Center.

The Harry Ransom Center’s newest exhibition Arnold Newman: Masterclass opens tomorrow and runs through May 12.

 

This exhibition explores the career of photographer Arnold Newman (1918–2006), who created iconic portraits of some of the most influential innovators, celebrities, and cultural figures of the twentieth century. Newman’s archive resides at the Ransom Center.

 

A bold modernist with a superb sense of compositional geometry, Newman is known for a crisp, spare style that situates his subjects in their personal surroundings rather than in a photographer’s studio. Marlene Dietrich, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Arthur Miller, Salvador Dalí, and Pablo Picasso are only a few of his celebrated sitters. Featuring more than 200 of these well-known masterworks, Arnold Newman: Masterclass also includes rarely seen work prints and contact sheets.

 

The first major exhibition of the photographer’s work since his death, Arnold Newman: Masterclass showcases the entire range of Newman’s photography, featuring many prints for the first time.

 

The exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

 

Also, join the Ransom Center for “Face to Face,” the opening celebration for the exhibition on Friday, February 15. Get a first look at the exhibition, enter a drawing for an Arnold Newman-inspired prize package, and enjoy refreshments from Austin Wine Merchant, Dripping Springs Vodka, and The Cupcake Bar. Guests will also have the opportunity to pose in one of Newman’s iconic portraits in an analog photo booth created by the Lomography Gallery Store and to view screenings of Arnold Newman interviews and film clips in the theater.

 

Become a member now to receive complimentary admission and valet parking at “Face to Face.” If you are not yet a member, you may order individual tickets for $20 (valet parking not included). Join or order tickets online or by calling 512-232-3669.

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