Coming soon: Peruvian Photography at the Blanton

Opening Saturday, April 23, the Blanton Museum of Art presents Fixing Shadows: Contemporary Peruvian Photography, 1968–2015, featuring more than 40 works from a transformational period of artistic growth, political turmoil, and social engagement in Peru. Realized in collaboration with the university’s Harry Ransom Center, this exhibition will present photographs from their esteemed collection alongside new Blanton acquisitions. The exhibition further explores the influence of an important generation of photographers working in Peru during the 1970s and 1980s on the practices of a younger generation working since the 1990s. Fixing Shadows includes works by Fernando La Rosa, Mariella Agois, Carlos Domínguez, Milagros de la Torre, and Pablo Hare, among others.

Woman with child and photograph of missing husband

Loans from the Ransom Center’s Photography Collection and William P. Wright Collection of Peruvian Photography will comprise works by key artists active during the 1970s and 1980s, while the Blanton will present new acquisitions by artists working from the 1990s through the present. Together, the collections chronicle the history of Peruvian photography from the last five decades and will evidence changing attitudes concerning the role of the medium in relation to art and social justice in Peru from 1968 through 2015.

1968–1989

Works from the Harry Ransom Center

The William P. Wright Collection of Peruvian Photography consists of works by some of the most influential photographers working in the 1970s and 1980s in Peru, including Roberto Fantozzi, Mariella Agois, Billy Hare, Carlos Domínguez, and Jaime Rázuri, and was assembled by photographer and curator Fernando Castro. Before the 1970s, photography was widely considered to be a purely documentary medium. During the 1970s, however, photographers and critics worked hard to transform this notion, and photography began to assume a status on par with literature or painting as an artistic medium in its own right, producing artists and collectives dedicated to photography as a form of artistic self expression. In the 1980s, violence and political struggle devastated Peru as the Maoist insurgents, Sendero Luminoso (“Shining Path”) waged a brutal guerilla war against the Peruvian state. During this time, photojournalism assumed a role of great importance in the country, as photography provided not only crucial visual evidence of the violence taking place across Peru but also denounced it.

1990–2015

Works from the Blanton Museum of Art

WMiguel Grau, Bahia Torgugas, Ancash

The Blanton will present works by Peruvian photographers active from the 1990s through 2015 that both complement and expand upon themes developed by photographs from the Ransom Center’s collection. Many of these photographs are new acquisitions by the Blanton, all by artists that maintain strong connections to the visual and conceptual histories of photography in Peru. Works by Milagros de la Torre, Flavia Gandolfo, Luz Maria Bedoya, Pablo Hare, Edi Hirose, Gilda Mantilla, Raimond Chavez, and others, will address the intricacies of Peruvian history and the country’s national identity, both within Peru and around the globe. Milagros de la Torre’s Under the Black Sun (1991–1993) directly confronts photographic traditions in Peru in terms of race and national memory, serving as a transitional marker between practices of artists from the 1970s and 1980s and those working in the 1990s and 2000s. Luz Maria Bedoya’s quiet contemplative series Blind Spot (1997) captures glimpses of a desert landscape along Peru’s Pan-American Highway, intentionally countering expectations of more spectacular scenery typically associated with the Peruvian Andes. Finally, two works from Edi Hirose’s Canteras del Sillar (2015) expose environmental devastation in the stone quarries outside of Areuqipa, Peru’s former capital and famously “white city.”

Make sure to visit the Blanton starting Saturday, April 23 to see this powerful new exhibition, and learn more on the Blanton’s website.

This exhibition is organized by the Blanton Museum of Art in collaboration with the Harry Ransom Center.

Image captions:

Domínguez, Carlos “Chino”
Madre e hijo con foto de padre desaparecido. Ayacucho, Perú
[Woman with child and photograph of missing husband. Ayacucho, Peru] 1985
Gelatin silver print
14 x 10.9 in
Gift of William P. Wright, Jr., From the exhibition The Peruvians As Seen By Peruvian Photographers, curated by Fernando Castro and made available by the Texas Humanities Resource Center, a division of the Texas Committee for the Humanities, Photography Collection, Harry Ransom Center

Hare, Pablo.
Miguel Grau, Bahía Tortugas, Ancash, de la serie Monumentos, 2005-2012
[Miguel Grau, Bahía Tortugas, Ancash, from the series Monuments, 2005-2012] Inkjet print on fiber paper
11.5 x 14.5 in
Blanton Museum of Art, Gift of the artist and purchase through the generosity of Jeanne and Michael Klein, Kathleen Irvin Loughlin and Christopher Loughlin, and Anthony and Celeste Meier, 2016

“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” now open at the Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center celebrates 150 years of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with an exhibition for the curious and curiouser of all ages. Learn about Lewis Carroll and the real Alice who inspired his story. See one of the few surviving copies of the first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Discover the rich array of personal and literary references that Carroll incorporated throughout Alice. Explore the surprising transformations of Alice and her story as they have traveled through time and across continents. Follow the White Rabbit’s path through the exhibition, have a tea party, or watch a 1933 paper filmstrip that has been carefully treated by Ransom Center conservators. The Center’s vast collections offer a new look at a story that has delighted generations and inspired artists from Salvador Dalí to Walt Disney.

 

The exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center galleries, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Daily public tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

 

The exhibition runs through July 6.

Ransom Center partners with KUT for “Views & Brews” discussion on “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from "Gone With the Wind."

Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from “Gone With the Wind.”

Join Ransom Center Curator of Film Steve Wilson, University of Texas faculty Daina Ramey Berry and Coleman Hutchison, and KUT Producer Rebecca McInroy for a “Views and Brews” discussion about Gone With The Wind and the film’s legacy on Tuesday, November 4, at 6 p.m. at the Cactus Cafe. The salon-style discussion will be taped live for a later broadcast on KUT 90.5.

 

This program is in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind, on view through January 4. The exhibition reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released. View rarely seen items—photographs, storyboards, fan mail, and costumes—all drawn from the Ransom Center’s collections.

Now open at the Ransom Center: “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

"The Making of Gone With The Wind" is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

“The Making of Gone With The Wind” is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

The exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

 

Go behind the scenes of one of the classic films of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Featuring more than 300 rarely seen and some never-before-exhibited materials, the exhibition is drawn entirely from the Ransom Center’s collections and includes on-set photographs, storyboards, correspondence and fan mail, production records, makeup stills, concept art, costume sketches, audition footage, and producer David O. Selznick’s memos. The green curtain dress and other gowns worn by Vivien Leigh are displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

 

Before a single frame of film was shot, Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy. Selznick struggled to balance his desire for authenticity with audience expectations of spectacle. Americans debated who should be cast as Rhett and Scarlett. There were serious concerns about how the 1939 film, based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, would depict race, sex, and violence in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

This insider view reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

 

Admission to the exhibition is free. No tickets or reservations are required. Your donation supports the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs.

 

The Making of Gone With The Wind can be seen starting Sept. 9 in the Ransom Center Galleries on Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Member-only hours are offered on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon.

 

Public tours are offered every day at noon, as well as Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Selected Gone With The Wind screentests will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on weekends, immediately following the public tour.

 

A fully illustrated exhibition catalog of the same title will be co-published by the Harry Ransom Center and University of Texas Press in September with a foreword written by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) host and film historian Robert Osborne. Generous support for the exhibition has been provided by TCM.

 

Complementing the physical exhibition is the web exhibition Producing Gone With The Wind, which explores the purchase of the rights to Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone With The Wind; the casting of the star actress, Vivien Leigh, as Scarlett O’Hara; and the research-intensive aesthetic work in the film related to costumes, hair, and makeup. The exhibition also gives online visitors and researchers an opportunity to search through a selection of more than 3,000 letters from the David O. Selznick collection, by individuals who sought auditions, solicited employment, and protested the production.

Explore World War I propaganda posters online in Ransom Center’s new digital collection

Sem (1863–1934). “Pour la liberté du monde. Souscrivez á l'Emprunt National á la Banque Nationale de Crédit.” [For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Crédit.] 1917. Lithograph. 119 x 77 cm.

Sem (1863–1934). “Pour la liberté du monde. Souscrivez á l’Emprunt National á la Banque Nationale de Crédit.” [For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Crédit.] 1917. Lithograph. 119 x 77 cm.

The Harry Ransom Center recently launched a new platform of digital collections on its website, which includes the World War I poster collection. More than 120 items from that collection can be viewed on the new platform. Some of these posters can also be seen in the Ransom Center’s current exhibition The World at War 1914–1918, which is on view through August 3.

 

In the era before broadcast radio and television, posters were one of the simplest and most powerful ways to coerce or inform the public. During the First World War, all the major powers produced posters to convey messages rapidly and efficiently.

 

The Ransom Center’s World War I poster collection illuminates the lived experience of the war from the point of view of everyday people worldwide. Lithographs in English, French, German, and Russian illustrate a wide spectrum of sentiments from military boosterism to appeals for public austerity. (English translations of foreign-language poster titles are available in the description of each item.) The posters document geo-political events and the social and economic transformations set in motion by the war. The role of women, new technologies, international aid, wartime economy, and food supply all feature prominently in the collection.
Explore the World War I poster collection to see more examples of artists using lithography to transform political ideas into persuasive compositions of image and text.

 

Ransom Center public services intern Elizabeth Lovero contributed to this blog post.

 

Please click on the thumbnails below to see larger images.

Save the date for annual ACC Concert Crawl!

Butterfield

WEATHER UPDATE, 4/6: It’s raining! This means we’re going with the inclement weather plan for today’s Austin Cultural Campus Spring Concert Crawl. Instead of one of the four spots being Mark di Suvero’s sculpture, we’ll be in the POB atrium (at Speedway & 24th) where Deborah Butterfield’s horse sculpture, “Vermillion”, is on view. All other locations are the same. See you soon! 

Austin’sCultural Campus (ACC) is looking forward to co-hosting the annual spring Concert Crawl on Sunday, 6 April with free admission and live music. This innovative and fun music concert series is co-presented with the Butler School of Music. A series of short, informal music concerts performed by talented students of the Butler School of Music will be presented at four of Austin’s most popular cultural destinations. Concert programs will begin at 1:00pm, 2:00pm, and 3:00pm at each venue. Each mini-concert will feature a variety of music masterworks specifically chosen to respond to the art and collections exhibited at the museums. Travel from each location to hear all four music programs, and enjoy an inspiring afternoon of music, history, art, and fun. Kick off the afternoon at whichever spot you like, and then visit the rest in the order that strikes your fancy. The weather is predicted to be sunny, beautiful, and in the low to mid 70s.

A trombone quartet will perform a selection of trombone quartets at Mark di Suvero’s Clock Knot in Landmarks’ public art collection (the tall red abstract sculpture located on the lawn at the corner of East Dean Keeton & Speedway streets). At the Harry Ransom Center (300 West 21st Street), a string quartet will perform Beethoven’s Opus 59, No. 1. At the Blanton Museum of Art (200 E Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard), a piano trio will perform Astor Piazzolla’s Four Seasons. And right across the street from the Blanton, The Bullock Texas State History Museum (1800 Congress Avenue, will feature a wind quartet performing John Harbison’s Quintet for Winds.

Mark di Suvero's "Clock Knot"

Mark di Suvero’s “Clock Knot”

We’d love to see pics of your experience! Share with us at #ATXCulturalCampus.

Rain or shine. See you there!

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“The World at War, 1914–1918” exhibition opens at the Harry Ransom Center

WW1_identity_300dpi

The exhibition The World at War, 1914–1918 is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through August 3.

 

This exhibition marks the centenary of the start of World War I, a war that lasted four long years and killed ten million servicemen. The geo-political causes, the war’s global expansion, and the outcomes of the war are well documented. The collective personal and national trauma inflicted on all who experienced the war, however, remains relevant for a contemporary world still embroiled in conflict.

 

Drawing on the Ransom Center’s extensive collections, this exhibition illuminates the experience of the war from the point of view of its participants and observers, preserved through letters, drafts, and diaries; memoirs and novels; and photographs and propaganda posters. Visitors will have the opportunity to better understand the history of the war through the archives of those who witnessed it first-hand.

 

The World at War, 1914–1918 (University of Texas Press and the Harry Ransom Center), by exhibition curators Jean Cannon and Elizabeth Garver and with a foreword by author Stephen Harrigan, is a fully illustrated companion catalog.

 

Beginning February 18, free docent-led tours will be offered on Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., Saturdays at 2 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. For groups larger than 10 people, please contact the Ransom Center to make arrangements for a private group tour.

 

For related programming, please visit the Ransom Center’s upcoming events page.

2013 Holiday Museum Crawl

2013 holidaycrawl

Enjoy festive music, hot beverages, special discounts and a prize drawing!

‘Tis the season to shop local, and Austin’s Cultural Campus is offering a shopping event to get everyone in the holiday spirit! Downtown Austin is a cultural destination, where unique shops within walking distance of one another offer museum-quality gifts that allow you to make meaningful purchases that support art, history and science in your city.

The Blanton Museum of Art, Bullock Texas State History Museum, Harry Ransom Center, LBJ Presidential Library, Texas Memorial Museum, and the Visual Arts Center have joined forces to present the 2013 Holiday Museum Crawl on Saturday, December 7, with festive music, hot beverages and special discounts for those who mention the Austin Cultural Campus.

By shopping in Austin museums and cultural centers, you can find distinctive gifts, such as original art work, nature-themed jewelry, dinosaur goodies, collectibles, souvenirs or the official state ornament. For a gift that lasts all year, purchase a membership and receive a free gift at some locations while supplies last. Sign up at any location to be entered in a special prize package drawing.

Explore Austin’s museum shops online:

Blanton Museum of Art

Bullock Texas State History Museum

Harry Ransom Center

LBJ Presidential Library

Texas Memorial Museum

Visual Arts Center

75 Years, 75 Days: Donate now to support the fall 2014 “Gone With The Wind” exhibition

The Harry Ransom Center is raising $50,000 in 75 days for the Center’s 2014 exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind. This Hollywood classic premiered in 1939 and will mark its 75th anniversary in 2014.

Film producer David O. Selznick’s 1939 epic film Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy before a single frame was shot. Based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, the film’s depictions of race, violence, and cultural identity in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction continue to both compel and trouble audiences around the world.

The exhibition will reveal surprising new stories about the making of this quintessential film from Hollywood’s Golden Age and illustrate why it remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

The exhibition will include over 300 original items from the Selznick archive housed at the Ransom Center, including behind-the-scenes photographs, storyboards, correspondence, production records, audition footage, and fan mail. The exhibition will also feature gowns worn by Vivien Leigh as the beautiful and ambitious Scarlett O’Hara. These recently conserved costumes will be displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

Your support will provide funds for outreach, additional docent-led tours, a published exhibition catalog, and complementary programming and presentations. Donors will be acknowledged on the Ransom Center’s website and receive the following:

$10-$499: Commemorative save-the-date postcard with an image from the Ransom Center’s collection.

$500-$999: Complimentary Ransom Center membership for one year, at the dual level, which includes two tickets to the exhibition opening party.

$1,000-$4,999: Complimentary copy of the exhibition catalog.

$5,000+: Special curators’ tour for up to six people.

75 Days, 75 Years

75 Days, 75 Years

“Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan” exhibition opens at the Harry Ransom Center

Eli Reed. "Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya." August 2001, printed 2013. Inkjet print. © Eli Reed / Magnum Photos.

Eli Reed. “Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya.” August 2001, printed 2013. Inkjet print. © Eli Reed / Magnum Photos.

The Harry Ransom Center presents Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan, an exhibition of photographs by Eli Reed (b. 1946), Magnum photographer and Clinical Professor of Photojournalism at The University of Texas at Austin. In 2001, Reed traced the path of some of the more than 20,000 “Lost Boys,” as aid workers have called them, some as young as five years old, forced to flee after their families were massacred or enslaved during the Second Sudanese Civil War. Wandering the equatorial wilderness between Sudan and Ethiopia for years on foot, those who survived starvation and disease eventually reached a refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, where over 3,000 of them awaited resettlement through a United Nations partnership with the U. S. State Department. Reed’s powerful series documents their journey as they leave the camp and adjust to life in the United States, acclimating to a starkly different culture and a new world of formidable challenges.

Organized by curators Jessica S. McDonald and Roy L. Flukinger, Eli Reed: The Lost Boys of Sudan runs through December 8. Additional photographs by Reed from his 1995 series Rwandan Refugees in Tanzania are on view as part of the exhibition Radical Transformation: Magnum Photos into the Digital Age, which features over 450 photographs, books, magazines, films, and videos.

Reed joined the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin in January 2005. He has been associated with the Magnum Photos agency since 1983 and became a full member in 1988. His early projects focus on political upheaval and social justice in El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, and Panama. In 1982 he was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he studied political science, urban affairs, and the prospects for peace in Central America. He has since photographed around the world while persistently addressing political, social, and racial issues in the United States.

Reed is the author of the acclaimed books Beirut: City of Regrets(1988) and Black in America (1997). He directed the documentary film Getting Out (1992) on Detroit gangs, and has worked as a stills and specials photographer for major motion pictures. His photographs have been published in numerous magazines and newspapers, including National GeographicTimeNewsweekThe New York TimesThe Washington PostVogueHarpers Bazaar,Stern, and Vanity Fair. Reed has lectured and taught extensively, and his photographs have been exhibited internationally. In 2009 he delivered a four-part lecture and multimedia presentation at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway, for the opening night of the exhibition “Fra King til Obama.”