Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in "Gone With The Wind."

Holiday break hours at the Ransom Center

Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in "Gone With The Wind."
Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in “Gone With The Wind.”

The Harry Ransom Center will be closed on Christmas Eve Day (Wednesday, December 24) and Christmas Day (Thursday, December 25). However, the Ransom Center Galleries will be open the rest of winter break on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. Additional member-only hours will be available from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

 

Visitors can view the current exhibitions The Making of Gone With The Wind and Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and HummingbirdThe Making of Gone With The Wind will be open through January 5. The First Photograph and the Gutenberg Bible remain on permanent display.

 

Please also be aware that the Reading and Viewing Rooms and administrative office will be closed during the University holidays from Saturday, December 20, through Thursday, January 1.

 

Free docent-led gallery tours of The Making of Gone With The Wind occur daily at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. (There will be no public tour on the closed days of Wednesday, December 24 or Thursday, December 25.) The public tours meet in the lobby, and no reservations are required. On weekends, a selection of screentests from Gone With The Wind will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

 

Admission is free. Your donation will support the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs. Parking information and a map are available online.

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Conceptual Art and Politics in Latin America

On November 7, internationally recognized sculptor and installation artist Doris Salcedo presented a lecture at the Blanton on her work and its connection to political history. A native of Bogotá, Colombia, Salcedo makes art using specific historical events—both from Latin America and abroad—as entry points for issues of global resonance, like political violence and discrimination. A small installation of Salcedo’s work is on view in conjunction with the talk. Though international in scope, Salcedo’s body of work is in dialogue with a vital history of political and conceptual art from South America—an area well represented in the Blanton’s collection. Many artists began using conceptual or subversive strategies in earnest during the 1970s and ’80s, when oppressive military dictatorships emerged across the region.

Cildo Meireles, Zero Dollar, 1984, offset lithograph, 2 3/4 x 6 1/4 in., Anonymous gift, 2003
Cildo Meireles, Zero Dollar, 1984, offset lithograph, 2 3/4 x 6 1/4 in., Anonymous gift, 2003

In Brazil, artists endeavored to make works that could circumvent official state censorship. One such artist was Cildo Meireles, who Blanton visitors may know best through his permanent installation Missão/Missões [Mission/Missions] (How to Build Cathedrals). Rather than make paintings or prints to hang on a gallery wall, Meireles utilized everyday objects and existing circuits of exchange—like the circulation of currency and the recycling system—to disseminate his art. Zero cruzeiro (1974-1978) and Zero Dollar (1984) are two such works in the Blanton’s collection. The two “counterfeit” banknotes question the value ascribed to currency and underscore its symbolic link to the nation. They also carry more historically specific meanings: in the case of the cruzeiro, the repeated devaluation of Brazil’s currency beginning in the late 1960s; and, in the case of the dollar, U.S. domination of the global economy. With the intent of stimulating conversation and debate, Meireles distributed versions of his Zero cruzeiro (and corresponding Zero centavo coin) within Brazil.

Eugenio Dittborn
Eugenio Dittborn, No Tracks (Airmail Painting No. 13), 1983, photo screenprint, 68 7/8 x 57 5/16 in., Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1991

Another South American artist working to evade government censorship during this period was Eugenio Dittborn of Chile. In 1983, a decade into the brutal dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, Dittborn developed a form of circulating art that would become his trademark. The artist applied found images and texts, using various artistic processes, to large sheets of brown wrapping paper. He then folded the compositions down to a fraction of their size and mailed them to international destinations. For one such “Airmail Painting,” No Tracks (Airmail Painting No. 13), Dittborn transferred mug shots of women found in old detective magazines on to the paper. The portraits evoke images of desaparecidos, those mysteriously abducted or killed under military regimes in Chile, Argentina, and elsewhere. By distributing his work on inconspicuous materials via the postal service, Dittborn bypassed the normal barriers to entry of the art market (such as the high cost of shipping a work on canvas). He also succeeded in communicating coded messages about Chile’s political climate to the outside world, thereby, in his words, “[salvaging] memory within a political climate that attempted to erase virtually every trace of it.”

Luis Camnitzer
Luis Camnitzer, He feared thirst, plate 18 from Uruguayan Torture Series, 1983, four-color photo etching on chine collé, 29 3/8 x 21 3/4 in., Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1992

Artists living abroad were able to respond more freely to the political instability in their native countries. Luis Camnitzer, a Uruguayan artists and activist, was living in New York when Uruguay fell under a repressive military dictatorship. He was deeply affected by the regime’s human rights abuses, which he learned about from friends and colleagues who had remained there. Camnitzer’s commitment to socially responsible art led him to create the Uruguayan Torture Series, in which he subtly employed visual and textual devices to evoke the psychological trauma of torture. Closely cropped and printed in a soft, ethereal palette, the images seem inviting on first glance. It is only upon another look that text and image interact to reveal more ominous implications. Camnitzer hoped that these images would awaken a world audience to the crimes being committed in his home country.

An installation of Salcedo’s work will be on view in the Blanton’s Klein Gallery from Nov. 7 to Feb. 22, 2015.

Beth Shook is the Blanton’s Curatorial Associate for Latin American art. She holds an M.A. in Art History from George Mason University, where she specialized in 20th-century Latin America.

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Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from "Gone With the Wind."

Ransom Center partners with KUT for “Views & Brews” discussion on “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from "Gone With the Wind."
Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from “Gone With the Wind.”

Join Ransom Center Curator of Film Steve Wilson, University of Texas faculty Daina Ramey Berry and Coleman Hutchison, and KUT Producer Rebecca McInroy for a “Views and Brews” discussion about Gone With The Wind and the film’s legacy on Tuesday, November 4, at 6 p.m. at the Cactus Cafe. The salon-style discussion will be taped live for a later broadcast on KUT 90.5.

 

This program is in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind, on view through January 4. The exhibition reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released. View rarely seen items—photographs, storyboards, fan mail, and costumes—all drawn from the Ransom Center’s collections.

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Slide Slam at the Visual Arts Center

Mark Dion bird watching (left), David Brooks with fish (right)
Mark Dion bird watching (left), David Brooks with fish (right)

In September the VAC’s artist-in-residence David Brooks gave a talk detailing the inanimate material culture that formed the basis of his current exhibition Repositioned Core, in which a geologic core sample bisects the space of the Vaulted Gallery. As a contrast to the inert and the geological, Brooks has invited artist Mark Dion to join him in a dynamic Slide Slam, delving into the liveliness and diversity found within the animal kingdom. Join Brooks and Dion as they argue the virtuosity of one species over another, comparing research and past work to illustrate the exuberance of animate life hovering atop the lifeless geological.

Learn more about the artists and join us November 3!

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Enio Iommi
Línea continua, c. 1949-52
Stainless steel,
9 5/8 x 11 ¾ x 11 ¾ in.
Promised gift of Judy and Charles Tate

Celebrating Latin American Art at the Blanton this Fall

As you may have seen in the Houston ChronicleHyperallergic, and elsewhere, we are thrilled to share that the Blanton has been gifted approximately 120 modern and contemporary Latin American artworks from UT alumni Judy and Charles Tate of Houston. In addition, the Tates have made a major contribution towards the endowment that supports the museum’s Latin American curatorship. Their collection—the entirety of which will ultimately come to the Blanton—includes painting, drawing, prints, sculpture, and mixed media works by artists Tarsila do Amaral, Lygia Clark, Frida Kahlo, Carlos Mérida, Wifredo Lam, Armando Reverón, Diego Rivera, Alejandro Xul Solar, and Joaquín Torres-García, among others. Spanning the early 20th century to the present, the gift features many of the artists who were key to the creation of modernism in Latin America. 

Enio Iommi Línea continua, c. 1949-52 Stainless steel, 9 5/8 x 11 ¾ x 11 ¾ in. Promised gift of Judy and Charles Tate
Enio Iommi
Línea continua, c. 1949-52
Stainless steel,
9 5/8 x 11 ¾ x 11 ¾ in.
Promised gift of Judy and Charles Tate

For over fifteen years, the Tates have built a collection that complements the museum’s existing holdings of more than 2,100 Latin American objects. Highlights include: an ethereal painting by Armando Reverón from the 1920s; a 1946 graphite drawing by Frida Kahlo and a cubist period drawing by Diego Rivera; two paintings and an ink drawing by Wifredo Lam spanning his time in France in the late 1930s to his return to Cuba in the 1940s; a 1951 surrealist painting by Leonora Carrington; a 1953 glass mosaic by Carlos Mérida—a playful fusion of abstraction and figuration; mid-20th-century kinetic and concrete works by important artists Jesús Rafael Soto, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Lygia Clark, Willys de Castro, Lothar Charoux, Mira Schendel, and Hélio Oiticica; and contemporary works by Fernando Botero, Waltercio Caldas, Jorge Macchi, and Sebastián Gordín.

From September 20, 2014 – February 15, 2015, the Blanton will present a selection of approximately 70 works from the collection. Entitled La línea continuathe exhibition takes its name from an elegant sculpture from the collection by Enio Iommi: a stainless steel “line” that traces an infinite loop in space. The work is also a fitting metaphor for the continual and nourishing connection between Judy and Charles Tate, the University of Texas, and the Blanton.

To bookend and contextualize the works in La línea continua, the Blanton has organized two counterpart installations that together span much of the history, culture, and geography of Latin America.

Re-envisioning the Virgin Mary: Colonial Painting from South America features seven paintings on loan from two of the country’s most distinguished collections of colonial South American art—the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, New York, and the Marilynn and Carl Thoma Collection, Chicago. The paintings, created in what are now the countries of Peru and Venezuela, represent devotions to Mary that were popular in Spain in the 17th and 18th centuries and brought to the Americas by Spanish colonists.

On the contemporary front, a selection of works from internationally recognized artist Doris Salcedo will be displayed. Salcedo addresses themes of loss and mourning with works that cross international boundaries. Employing domestic objects such as furniture and clothing—once activated and personal—her sculptures explore the history of violence and oppression in her native Colombia and beyond, giving voice to the marginalized, missing, or deceased.

Looking for more Latin American art from our collection? Visit our website, or check out our Pinterest board with works from the collection and the Tate gift. Don’t miss seeing these incredible works of Latin American art at the Blanton this season!

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A rendering of A Mathematical

Landmarks Presents: Opening Reception and Q&A for Artist Casey Reas

A rendering of "A Mathematical Theory of Communication" by Casey Reas.
A rendering of A Mathematical Theory of Communication by Casey Reas.

Join Landmarks, the public art program of The University of Texas at Austin, and UT’s Department of Computer Science on Friday, October 10, 2014 for the unveiling of A Mathematical Theory of Communication by Casey Reas.

Reas, a digital media artist and professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, has explored software as an artistic medium for more than a decade. His open source programming language explores visual systems and emergent form, blending computer science technology and visual art traditions. He has been featured in galleries and museums internationally, in more than 100 solo and group exhibitions. Reas’s installation at the Gates Dell Complex will be a large-scale, computer generated application featured on two walls near the main atrium. A Mathematical Theory of Communication will be the third work of public art associated with the GDC building, complementing the works of Sol LeWitt installed in 2013.

5:30 p.m. – Public Q&A with artist Casey Reas and moderator Christiane Paul, Ph.D.
Gates Dell Complex 2.216

6:30 p.m. – Celebratory reception with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres.
Gates Dell Complex atrium

Please RSVP to assure your spot.

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"The Making of Gone With The Wind" is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

Now open at the Ransom Center: “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

"The Making of Gone With The Wind" is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.
“The Making of Gone With The Wind” is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

The exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

 

Go behind the scenes of one of the classic films of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Featuring more than 300 rarely seen and some never-before-exhibited materials, the exhibition is drawn entirely from the Ransom Center’s collections and includes on-set photographs, storyboards, correspondence and fan mail, production records, makeup stills, concept art, costume sketches, audition footage, and producer David O. Selznick’s memos. The green curtain dress and other gowns worn by Vivien Leigh are displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

 

Before a single frame of film was shot, Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy. Selznick struggled to balance his desire for authenticity with audience expectations of spectacle. Americans debated who should be cast as Rhett and Scarlett. There were serious concerns about how the 1939 film, based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, would depict race, sex, and violence in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

This insider view reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

 

Admission to the exhibition is free. No tickets or reservations are required. Your donation supports the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs.

 

The Making of Gone With The Wind can be seen starting Sept. 9 in the Ransom Center Galleries on Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Member-only hours are offered on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon.

 

Public tours are offered every day at noon, as well as Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Selected Gone With The Wind screentests will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on weekends, immediately following the public tour.

 

A fully illustrated exhibition catalog of the same title will be co-published by the Harry Ransom Center and University of Texas Press in September with a foreword written by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) host and film historian Robert Osborne. Generous support for the exhibition has been provided by TCM.

 

Complementing the physical exhibition is the web exhibition Producing Gone With The Wind, which explores the purchase of the rights to Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone With The Wind; the casting of the star actress, Vivien Leigh, as Scarlett O’Hara; and the research-intensive aesthetic work in the film related to costumes, hair, and makeup. The exhibition also gives online visitors and researchers an opportunity to search through a selection of more than 3,000 letters from the David O. Selznick collection, by individuals who sought auditions, solicited employment, and protested the production.

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