From Harry Ransom Center

Down the Rabbit Hole with Landmarks: A Public Art Tour

Landmarks_DocentTour_FigureOnATrunk_PhotoByPaulBardagjyVenture down the rabbit hole with Landmarks on a docent-led tour of public art on campus. Explore the nonsensical and the curious, and ponder some of the unanswerable questions surrounding contemporary works of art. The tour will conclude at the Harry Ransom Center where the exhibition Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland will be on view with a docent-led tour at noon.

Meet at 11 a.m. on Sunday, March 1 at Magdalena Abakanowicz’s Figure on a Trunk in front of Bass Concert Hall near 23rd Street and Robert Dedman Drive. Free and open to the public.

Sunday walking tours commence rain or shine. Please dress accordingly.

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“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” now open at the Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center celebrates 150 years of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with an exhibition for the curious and curiouser of all ages. Learn about Lewis Carroll and the real Alice who inspired his story. See one of the few surviving copies of the first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Discover the rich array of personal and literary references that Carroll incorporated throughout Alice. Explore the surprising transformations of Alice and her story as they have traveled through time and across continents. Follow the White Rabbit’s path through the exhibition, have a tea party, or watch a 1933 paper filmstrip that has been carefully treated by Ransom Center conservators. The Center’s vast collections offer a new look at a story that has delighted generations and inspired artists from Salvador Dalí to Walt Disney.

 

The exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center galleries, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Daily public tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

 

The exhibition runs through July 6.

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Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in "Gone With The Wind."

Holiday break hours at the Ransom Center

Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in "Gone With The Wind."
Scene concept for “Christmas at Aunt Pittypat’s in Atlanta” in “Gone With The Wind.”

The Harry Ransom Center will be closed on Christmas Eve Day (Wednesday, December 24) and Christmas Day (Thursday, December 25). However, the Ransom Center Galleries will be open the rest of winter break on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. Additional member-only hours will be available from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

 

Visitors can view the current exhibitions The Making of Gone With The Wind and Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and HummingbirdThe Making of Gone With The Wind will be open through January 5. The First Photograph and the Gutenberg Bible remain on permanent display.

 

Please also be aware that the Reading and Viewing Rooms and administrative office will be closed during the University holidays from Saturday, December 20, through Thursday, January 1.

 

Free docent-led gallery tours of The Making of Gone With The Wind occur daily at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. (There will be no public tour on the closed days of Wednesday, December 24 or Thursday, December 25.) The public tours meet in the lobby, and no reservations are required. On weekends, a selection of screentests from Gone With The Wind will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

 

Admission is free. Your donation will support the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs. Parking information and a map are available online.

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Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from "Gone With the Wind."

Ransom Center partners with KUT for “Views & Brews” discussion on “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from "Gone With the Wind."
Makeup still of Vivien Leigh from “Gone With the Wind.”

Join Ransom Center Curator of Film Steve Wilson, University of Texas faculty Daina Ramey Berry and Coleman Hutchison, and KUT Producer Rebecca McInroy for a “Views and Brews” discussion about Gone With The Wind and the film’s legacy on Tuesday, November 4, at 6 p.m. at the Cactus Cafe. The salon-style discussion will be taped live for a later broadcast on KUT 90.5.

 

This program is in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind, on view through January 4. The exhibition reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released. View rarely seen items—photographs, storyboards, fan mail, and costumes—all drawn from the Ransom Center’s collections.

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"The Making of Gone With The Wind" is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

Now open at the Ransom Center: “The Making of Gone With The Wind”

"The Making of Gone With The Wind" is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.
“The Making of Gone With The Wind” is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

The exhibition The Making of Gone With The Wind is on view at the Harry Ransom Center through January 4.

 

Go behind the scenes of one of the classic films of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Featuring more than 300 rarely seen and some never-before-exhibited materials, the exhibition is drawn entirely from the Ransom Center’s collections and includes on-set photographs, storyboards, correspondence and fan mail, production records, makeup stills, concept art, costume sketches, audition footage, and producer David O. Selznick’s memos. The green curtain dress and other gowns worn by Vivien Leigh are displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

 

Before a single frame of film was shot, Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy. Selznick struggled to balance his desire for authenticity with audience expectations of spectacle. Americans debated who should be cast as Rhett and Scarlett. There were serious concerns about how the 1939 film, based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, would depict race, sex, and violence in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.

 

This insider view reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

 

Admission to the exhibition is free. No tickets or reservations are required. Your donation supports the Ransom Center’s exhibitions and public programs.

 

The Making of Gone With The Wind can be seen starting Sept. 9 in the Ransom Center Galleries on Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Member-only hours are offered on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon.

 

Public tours are offered every day at noon, as well as Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. Selected Gone With The Wind screentests will be shown in the Ransom Center’s first-floor theater at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on weekends, immediately following the public tour.

 

A fully illustrated exhibition catalog of the same title will be co-published by the Harry Ransom Center and University of Texas Press in September with a foreword written by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) host and film historian Robert Osborne. Generous support for the exhibition has been provided by TCM.

 

Complementing the physical exhibition is the web exhibition Producing Gone With The Wind, which explores the purchase of the rights to Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone With The Wind; the casting of the star actress, Vivien Leigh, as Scarlett O’Hara; and the research-intensive aesthetic work in the film related to costumes, hair, and makeup. The exhibition also gives online visitors and researchers an opportunity to search through a selection of more than 3,000 letters from the David O. Selznick collection, by individuals who sought auditions, solicited employment, and protested the production.

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Photo by Pete Smith.

Displaying at World War I uniform at the Harry Ransom Center and a film series to complement “The World at War, 1914-1918”

Photo by Pete Smith.
Photo by Pete Smith.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at how Harry Ransom Center staff customized a mannequin to display a World War I uniform in the current exhibition The World at War, 1914–1918. Learn more about how custom legs were crafted and attached to an adolescent size dress form as Assistant Curator of Costumes and Personal Effects Jill Morena shares the step-by-step process that went into preparing this uniform for display.

 

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Ransom Center, Austin Film Society, and Paramount Theatre are presenting a series of films made during or about World War I.

 

The films will be screened throughout the summer at the Ransom Center, Paramount Theatre, and Austin Film Society. Films in the series include The African Queen (1951), The Big Parade (1925), Gallipoli (1981),  J’Accuse! (1919), Jules and Jim (1962), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943), Sergeant York (1941), A Farewell to Arms (1932), and Lawrence of Arabia (1962). View the full schedule.

 

Screenings at the Ransom Center are free. Tickets are required for screenings at the Paramount and Austin Film Society and may be purchased at their box offices or on the Paramount website or the Austin Film Society’s website.

 

In honor of Memorial Day, the Ransom Center Galleries will be open from 10 a.m.–5 p.m. next Monday, May 26. Join us for a free docent-led tour of the exhibition The World at War, 1914–1918 at noon. The Ransom Center’s administrative offices and Library Reading/Viewing Rooms will be closed for Memorial Day.

 

Image: Photo by Pete Smith.

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Z. P. Nikolaki. “Hello! This is Liberty speaking.” 1918. Lithograph. 30.5 x 22.5 cm.

Explore World War I propaganda posters online in Ransom Center’s new digital collection

Sem (1863–1934). “Pour la liberté du monde. Souscrivez á l'Emprunt National á la Banque Nationale de Crédit.” [For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Crédit.] 1917. Lithograph. 119 x 77 cm.
Sem (1863–1934). “Pour la liberté du monde. Souscrivez á l’Emprunt National á la Banque Nationale de Crédit.” [For the freedom of the world. Subscribe to the National Loan at the Banque Nationale de Crédit.] 1917. Lithograph. 119 x 77 cm.
The Harry Ransom Center recently launched a new platform of digital collections on its website, which includes the World War I poster collection. More than 120 items from that collection can be viewed on the new platform. Some of these posters can also be seen in the Ransom Center’s current exhibition The World at War 1914–1918, which is on view through August 3.

 

In the era before broadcast radio and television, posters were one of the simplest and most powerful ways to coerce or inform the public. During the First World War, all the major powers produced posters to convey messages rapidly and efficiently.

 

The Ransom Center’s World War I poster collection illuminates the lived experience of the war from the point of view of everyday people worldwide. Lithographs in English, French, German, and Russian illustrate a wide spectrum of sentiments from military boosterism to appeals for public austerity. (English translations of foreign-language poster titles are available in the description of each item.) The posters document geo-political events and the social and economic transformations set in motion by the war. The role of women, new technologies, international aid, wartime economy, and food supply all feature prominently in the collection.
Explore the World War I poster collection to see more examples of artists using lithography to transform political ideas into persuasive compositions of image and text.

 

Ransom Center public services intern Elizabeth Lovero contributed to this blog post.

 

Please click on the thumbnails below to see larger images.

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World War I across Austin’s Cultural Campus

PSM2925_loThe Harry Ransom Center’s current exhibition, The World at War, 1914–1918, showcases items from its collection that document a global perspective of the Great War. With propaganda posters, uniforms, and love letters on display, this exhibition illuminates the experience of the war from the point of view of its participants and observers.

Nearby the Ransom Center, visitors can enjoy another exhibition with historical significance at the Bullock Texas State History Museum. In collaboration with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, the Bullock Museum features an exhibit commemorating the 100th anniversary of the only surviving United States Navy vessel that served in both world wars: the USS TEXAS.Battleship Docked

The exhibit displays images and artifacts from the vessel’s 30 years of service that tell the story of life on board as well as the United States’ evolution into a global force. Visitors can see the champagne bottleneck from the ship’s launch, several electric candelabra that were on board, and many more important items from the ship’s history.

Battleship TEXAS will is on view in the Bullock’s 3rd Floor Rotunda Gallery until April 13, 2014. The World at War, 1914–1918 is on view until August 3, 2014 at the Ransom Center.

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