Now Screening: Shakespeare Film Series

By Kathleen Telling

The Ransom Center presents its Shakespeare Film Series in conjunction with the current exhibition Shakespeare in Print and Performance, on view through May 29, 2016.

From the stage to the silver screen, the works of William Shakespeare have captivated audiences since the earliest days of his playwriting. Reimagining the Bard’s famed productions, Hollywood has produced countless creations both adapted from and inspired by the works of Shakespeare. In conjunction with Shakespeare in Print and Performance, the Ransom Center screens four Shakespeare-related films to complement the exhibition: Hamlet, The Dresser, Titus, and Theatre of Blood.

Screenings are free and open to the public. The Ransom Center’s Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Laurence Olivier in <em>Hamlet</em> (1949)
Laurence Olivier in Hamlet (1949)

Hamlet

Thursday, May 5, 7 p.m.

 Sir Laurence Olivier directed and starred in Hamlet (1949). The first non-American film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture, its stark black and white designs reflect the desire to present the stories of Shakespeare as epics existing outside of time—an approach that mirrors the designs of Edward Gordon Craig and Norman Bel Geddes featured in the exhibition. Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts Eric Colleary introduces the film. Runtime 155 minutes, not rated.

 

 

<em>The Dresser</em> (1983)
The Dresser (1983)

The Dresser

Thursday, May 12, 7 p.m.

Ronald Harwood’s The Dresser (1983) is a WWII story of a deteriorating veteran Shakespeare actor (played by Albert Finney) whose personal assistant (Tom Courtenay) must rally the old man before each of his demanding performances. Harwood was the dresser to Donald Wolfit, whose repertory company performed across the U.K. during the Blitz, and whose papers reside at the Ransom Center. Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts Eric Colleary introduces the film. Ransom Center members are invited to a reception at 6 p.m. prior to the film. Runtime 118 minutes, rated PG.

 

 

Anthony Hopkins in <em>Titus</em> (1999)
Anthony Hopkins in Titus (1999)

Titus

Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m.

Director Julie Taymor’s Titus (1999) is a stunningly designed film adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s lesser-known works, with Anthony Hopkins starring as Titus Andronicus. Jessica Lange, Alan Cumming, and Jonathan Rhys Meyers co-star. Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts Eric Colleary introduces the film. Runtime 162 minutes, rated R.

 

 

 

Vincent Price in <em>Theatre of Blood</em> (1973)
Vincent Price in Theatre of Blood (1973)

Theatre of Blood
Thursday, May 26, 7 p.m.

Vincent Price stars in Theatre of Blood (1973), a cult classic about a maligned actor who invites all of his worst critics to an abandoned theater and kills them off one-by-one in the manner of Shakespearean tragedies. Cline Curator of Theater and Performing Arts Eric Colleary introduces the film. Runtime 104 minutes, rated R.

 

 

 

 

Receive the Harry Ransom Center’s latest news and information with eNews, a monthly email. Subscribe today.

Now on view: “Shakespeare in Print and Performance”

No writer is more central to the English literary tradition than William Shakespeare. For centuries, his works have intrigued and inspired generations of readers, audiences, and scholars. Four hundred years after his death, the Harry Ransom Center commemorates Shakespeare’s legacy by presenting a selection of rare and unique materials relating to his plays. These materials, primarily drawn from the Ransom Center’s collections, demonstrate how much we can learn about his historical context, sources, texts, and productions of the plays from early printed books and theatrical archives.

The exhibition, Shakespeare in Print and Performance, will be on view at the Harry Ransom Center through May 29. Free admission and daily tours. Plan your visit.

Frida Kahlo’s “Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird” at Harry Ransom Center

Frida Kahlo's "Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird"

Ken Grant inspects lighting for Frida Kahlo’s “Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird.” Photo by Pete Smith.

Ken Grant inspects lighting for Frida Kahlo’s “Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird.” Photo by Pete Smith.

The Ransom Center celebrates the homecoming of one of its most famous and frequently borrowed art works, the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s “Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird” (1940).

The painting is on display in the Ransom Center’s lobby through December 31, 2017.

Since 1990 the painting has been featured in exhibitions in more than 25 museums in the United States and around the world, including Australia, Canada, France, Spain, Mexico and Italy.

The painting was most recently on view at the New York Botanical Garden’s exhibition FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life, which had record-breaking attendance of more than 525,000 visitors.

Kahlo (1907-1954) taught herself how to paint after she was severely injured in a bus accident at the age of 18. For Kahlo, painting became an act of cathartic ritual, and her symbolic images portray a cycle of pain, death and rebirth.

Kahlo’s affair in New York City with her friend, the Hungarian-born photographer Nickolas Muray (1892-1965), which ended in 1939, and her divorce from the artist Diego Rivera at the end of the year, left her heartbroken and lonely. But she produced some of her most powerful and compelling paintings and self-portraits during this time.

Muray purchased the self-portrait from Kahlo to help her during a difficult financial period. It is part of the Ransom Center’s Nickolas Muray collection of more than 100 works of modern Mexican art, which was acquired by the Center in 1966. The collection also includes “Still Life with Parrot and Fruit” (1951) and the drawing “Diego y Yo” (1930) by Kahlo.

“Twenty-four Hours with the Herd” performance with Graham Reynolds

Award-winning Austin composer Graham Reynolds re-imagine Texas artist Frank Reaugh’s groundbreaking 1933 performance Twenty-four Hours with the Herd during two performances on Friday, November 13, 2015 in the Texas Spirit Theater at the Bullock Museum. Featuring special musical guest Redd Volkaert and narration by Austin writer Gene Fowler, the performances brings to life seven panoramic pastel landscapes that constitute Reaugh’s landmark work through projections, live music, and 4D effects. This performance is presented in collaboration with the Bullock Museum’s current Tom Lea exhibition.

Ransom Center and Bullock Museum members who purchase tickets to the 7:15 p.m. performance receive exclusive access to a 6 p.m. reception. Enjoy cocktails and conversation with Bullock Museum and Harry Ransom Center curators as they further explore Frank Reaugh, the original performance of Twenty-four Hours with the Herd, Tom Lea, and the careers of these two Texas contemporaries.

 Purchase tickets online.
View the exhibition Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West, which includes the seven panoramic landscapes of Twenty-four Hours with the Herd, at the Harry Ransom Center through November 29.

Enjoy events at the Harry Ransom Center this fall

The Harry Ransom Center announces its fall calendar of events. View the full lineup of events.

Front graphic_fall calendarEnjoy programs related to the current exhibition, Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West, including:
• Curator’s Tour with Peter Mears (September 16)
• Poetry on the Plaza with poems inspired by the American West (September 24)
• Discussion of Frank Reaugh’s life and work with contributors to the exhibition’s companion publication, Windows on the West (October 1)
Twenty-Four Hours with the Herd performance featuring music by Graham Reynolds, projections, and 4-D effects (November 13; tickets required)

Join us for these literary events:
• “’Hearts with One Purpose Alone’: W. B. Yeats and the Irish Revolution” lecture by Roy Foster, with reception (October 22)
• A talk by Salman Rushdie (October 28; tickets available in September)
• Discussion with Jonathan Bate about his new biography, Ted Hughes: The Unauthorised Life (November 18)

Members receive exclusive invitations to deepen their engagement with the collections. Become a member for these opportunities.
• Director’s Reception and Open House featuring conservation, theater and performing arts, and more (November 4)
• Behind-the-scenes building tour with Cathy Henderson, Associate Director of Exhibitions (November 14)

Save the Date: “Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West”

Save the date! The Harry Ransom Center opens a new exhibition Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West on August 4.

Frank Reaugh (1860–1945) is one of the Southwest’s earliest and most distinguished artists. Working in the vein of American Impressionism, Reaugh (pronounced “Ray”) devoted his career to visually documenting the immense unsettled regions of the Southwest before the turn of the twentieth century. A restless and intrepid traveler, Reaugh sketched scenes while riding with cattlemen during the height of Texas’s historic roundups, and he led annual sketch trips to some of Texas’s most spectacular and remote locations. Drawing on more than 100 artworks from the Harry Ransom Center’s collection, as well as public and private collections across the state, the exhibition showcases Reaugh’s approach to landscape painting and his mastery of the pastel medium.

Join the online conversation with the hashtag #Reaugh.

The Ransom Center is free and open to the public.

Summer Activities for All Ages

Celebrate suAFM_2015_2mmer early and attend the Bullock Museum’s Music Under the Star: Spring Edition on Sunday, May 24 and Sunday, May 31 beginning at 4 p.m. Enjoy a free music concert featuring local talents on the Bullock’s plaza presented by the American Federation of Musicians.

For more musical adventures on Austin’s Cultural Campus, don’t miss the traveling exhibit Ladies and Gentlemen… The Beatles!, opening at the LBJ Presidential Library on Saturday, June 13. The exhibit’s opening day activities includes online essay writing service free admission all day, live music, and more!

Other upcoming summer events include:

SCHOOL’S OUT FOR SUMMER
TEXAS MEMORIAL MUSEUM
June 6, 2015, 9 a.m.

We are celebrating the end of a successful school year with FREE admission to the museum! Museum exhibits open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the activities run from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Scheduled activities:  The dig pit will be open to young paleontologists from 10 a.m. to 4 a.m. Fossil identifications will be available from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

YOUNG ADVENTURERS FILM SERIES
HARRY RANSOM CENTER
Saturdays in June at 3 p.m.

The Harry Ransom Center’s Young Adventurers Film Series kicks off on Saturday, June 6, at 3 p.m. with Disney’s film Alice in Wonderland (1951).

Drawing on Lewis Carroll’s books Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, the film has become one of the most popular representations of the Alice stories.

The program is free and open to the public, but donations are welcome. Seating is first-come, first-served, and doors open at 2:30 p.m. Run time is 75 minutes, and the film is rated G.

This series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center’s current exhibition Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, on view through July 6. Mark your calendar for the upcoming films James and the Giant Peach (June 13), Coraline (June 20), and Where the Wild Things Are (June 27.)

Enjoy these exhibitions on view at Austin’s Cultural Campus museums: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Wildly Strange: The Photographs of Ralph Eugene Meatyard, and Roller Derby.

Explore Austin’s Cultural Campus with your family

Photo by Whitney Martin.

Photo by Whitney Martin.

Spring is a perfect time to walk between museums, stopping for public art along the way.

Current exhibitions at Austin’s Cultural Campus institutions include: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, La Belle: The Ship That Changed History, Roller Derby, Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties, Up + Up: 2015 Senior Art Exhibition, and more!

Please note: The Texas Memorial Museum and Bullock Museum will be closed on April 5, Easter Sunday, and the Visual Arts Center is always closed on Sundays.

Interested in attending a program? Don’t miss upcoming family events at the Bullock Museum and Harry Ransom Center.

BULLOCK MUSEUM
CREATE YOUR OWN: ANCIENT ART SUPPLIES
April 4, 2015, 11–noon; 1–2 p.m.

Kids and families will make and take home their own artifacts in this art workshop. Each workshop features a short talk followed by hands-on art making. Ideal for families with children ages 8 and up, this experience is about 40 minutes in length. Museum members may make advance reservations by calling 512-936-4649. Otherwise, the program is first come, first served and space is limited. Pick up a boarding pass (free with Museum admission) when you arrive.

HARRY RANSOM CENTER
FAMILY DAYS
SATURDAY, APRIL 25, 10 A.M.–5 P.M. & SATURDAY, MAY 9, 10 A.M.–5 P.M.

Visit Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and enjoy activities for the young and young at heart. Participate in writing activities with teaching artists from Austin Public Library Friends Foundation’s Badgerdog Creative Writing Program or engage with Lewis Carroll-inspired math activities with local math literacy organization Math Happens. University of Texas at Austin museum theater students perform alongside items in the galleries. Additional activities include docent-led exhibition tours and story times in the theater. Family days are generously supported by a grant from the Austin Community Foundation, with in-kind support provided by Terra Toys.

Down the Rabbit Hole with Landmarks: A Public Art Tour

Landmarks_DocentTour_FigureOnATrunk_PhotoByPaulBardagjyVenture down the rabbit hole with Landmarks on a docent-led tour of public art on campus. Explore the nonsensical and the curious, and ponder some of the unanswerable questions surrounding contemporary works of art. The tour will conclude at the Harry Ransom Center where the exhibition Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland will be on view with a docent-led tour at noon.

Meet at 11 a.m. on Sunday, March 1 at Magdalena Abakanowicz’s Figure on a Trunk in front of Bass Concert Hall near 23rd Street and Robert Dedman Drive. Free and open to the public.

Sunday walking tours commence rain or shine. Please dress accordingly.

“Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” now open at the Harry Ransom Center

The Harry Ransom Center celebrates 150 years of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with an exhibition for the curious and curiouser of all ages. Learn about Lewis Carroll and the real Alice who inspired his story. See one of the few surviving copies of the first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Discover the rich array of personal and literary references that Carroll incorporated throughout Alice. Explore the surprising transformations of Alice and her story as they have traveled through time and across continents. Follow the White Rabbit’s path through the exhibition, have a tea party, or watch a 1933 paper filmstrip that has been carefully treated by Ransom Center conservators. The Center’s vast collections offer a new look at a story that has delighted generations and inspired artists from Salvador Dalí to Walt Disney.

 

The exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center galleries, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Daily public tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

 

The exhibition runs through July 6.